Latest Entries
Corporate patronage for the arts in France in the 1980s and 1990s : a matter of the State
Philanthropy and the State in France

Corporate patronage for the arts in France in the 1980s and 1990s : a matter of the State

Editors’ Note: Closing HistPhil‘s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France, Sabine Rozier underscores the central role played by the French State in encouraging philanthropy in France. More specifically, Rozier argues that the “French philanthropic renewal in the 1980s and 1990s” was less “the expression of the awakening of a ‘civil society’ that would have … Continue reading

Walmart Heirs Shift from Red to Purple: The Evolving Political Contributions of the Nation’s Richest Family
Current Events and Philanthropy

Walmart Heirs Shift from Red to Purple: The Evolving Political Contributions of the Nation’s Richest Family

Editors’ Note: Leslie K. Finger and Sarah Reckhow write on the changing nature of Walton family political contributions. In the 2012 election cycle, 72 percent of partisan federal and state election contributions from family members serving on the board of the Walton Family Foundation supported Republican candidates and committees. Four years later, in the 2016 … Continue reading

Philanthropy without a State? On the Importance of Thinking Locally or what 19th century French History Can Teach Us
Philanthropy and the State in France

Philanthropy without a State? On the Importance of Thinking Locally or what 19th century French History Can Teach Us

Editors’ Note: Continuing HistPhil‘s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France, Matthieu Brejon de Lavergnée illustrates “how the French State—throughout much of the nineteenth century—relied on public and private treatment of poverty.”   « Nous voyons les femmes du monde, même les plus élégantes et les plus frivoles, travailler sans cesse pour les pauvres ; elles brodent, elles … Continue reading

Poll Power, Money Power: The Voter Education Project, Philanthropy, and the Movement for the Ballot in the American South
New Works in the Field

Poll Power, Money Power: The Voter Education Project, Philanthropy, and the Movement for the Ballot in the American South

Editors’ Note: Evan Faulkenbury introduces his new book on the Voter Education Project, Poll Power: The Voter Education Project and the Movement for the Ballot in the American South. Without money, the civil rights movement would not have had the critical resources it needed to defeat Jim Crow at the ballot box. This may be … Continue reading

“The Capable Man”—The Philanthropic Man—in 19th Century France
Philanthropy and the State in France

“The Capable Man”—The Philanthropic Man—in 19th Century France

Editors’ Note: Continuing HistPhil’s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France, Nagisa Mitsushima discusses philanthropy and electoral democracy during the first half of the 19th century in France. In dialogue with French studies on philanthropy, Mitsushima’s historical research “proposes to transform the view that we usually take on philanthropy, by shifting our analysis of … Continue reading

A Social Construction of Public Interest: The “Reconnaissance d’Utilité Publique” of Associations and Foundations by the Council of State (1870-1914)
Philanthropy and the State in France

A Social Construction of Public Interest: The “Reconnaissance d’Utilité Publique” of Associations and Foundations by the Council of State (1870-1914)

Editors’ Note: Chloé Gaboriaux continues HistPhil’s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France. In this essay, Gaboriaux analyzes “how members of the French Council of State, in charge of authorizing the incorporation of nonprofit organizations, reasoned about the general value of foundations and associations at a time (1870-1914) when the young Republic was defining a … Continue reading

INTRODUCTION: Philanthropies and State Prestige in France, 19th-20th Centuries
Philanthropy and the State in France

INTRODUCTION: Philanthropies and State Prestige in France, 19th-20th Centuries

Editors’ Note: Nicolas Duvoux launches HistPhil’s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France. De-centering U.S. exceptionalism in the history of philanthropy, this forum provides a historical and present-day context to philanthropy in France. For HistPhil readers, this collection of essays furthermore provides an opportunity to analyze vital questions at the heart of civic life: … Continue reading

The State as a symbolic resource in the philanthropic world? The example of the American Friends groups of French cultural institutions
Philanthropy and the State in France

The State as a symbolic resource in the philanthropic world? The example of the American Friends groups of French cultural institutions

Editors’ Note: Anne Monier continues HistPhil‘s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France. Bringing a transnational lens to philanthropic giving in contemporary France (and with a particular focus on American Friends groups), Monier argues that the French State is playing a critical role in encouraging private funding of the country’s cultural institutions. Within this transnational … Continue reading

An Economic History Challenge to the History of Philanthropy
New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Historical Research

An Economic History Challenge to the History of Philanthropy

Editors’ Note: David Hammack reviews Organizations, Civil Society, and the Roots of Development, edited by Naomi R. Lamoreaux and John Joseph Wallis. For more than thirty years a growing literature has debated the origins of the market economy and the relation between the market and economic growth. Motivating this debate is the understanding, widely shared … Continue reading

Highlighting the (Elitist) History of the Charitable Contribution Income Tax Deduction
New Works in the Field

Highlighting the (Elitist) History of the Charitable Contribution Income Tax Deduction

Editors’ Note: Nicolas Duquette highlights the history of the charitable contribution income tax deduction, in a preview of an upcoming article in Business History Review.  The US charitable-contribution income-tax deduction marked its centennial in 2017. Relative to nearly every other aspect of the federal income tax, the workings of the deduction have changed little since its creation in … Continue reading

Giving Athletes: Why Sports Philanthropy Deserves Our Attention
Current Events and Philanthropy / Philanthropy

Giving Athletes: Why Sports Philanthropy Deserves Our Attention

Editors’ Note: Sarah Fields spotlights the need for more scholarly attention directed to the history of athletes’ philanthropy. Athletes are a complicated group. Sporting figures have long been celebrities, but they have not always been wealthy either as a class or as individuals. And yet they have long been involved in various ways with philanthropy and … Continue reading

The Fall of ACORN and the Timidity of Progressive Funders
Oral History/Testimonies

The Fall of ACORN and the Timidity of Progressive Funders

Editors’ Note: As regular readers of HistPhil will know, we ordinarily publish the work of scholars who write, or reflect on, the history of philanthropy. We have occasionally published comments of practitioners or observers who have something important to say to an audience of those interested in the history of philanthropy. The following post is … Continue reading

Force for Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence
New Works in the Field

Force for Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence

Editors’ Note: Kellie Carter Jackson makes the case for a fuller scholarly engagement with black abolitionists and their “profound understanding of the idea, experience and value of violence,” the subject of her new book, Force and Freedom. John Anderson was an escaped slave who fled to Canada. On July 5, 1861 the Toronto Globe recounted the speech he … Continue reading

Why Exercise Restraint when Funneling Money into Politics? An Appeal to Mega Donors’ Self Interest
New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Democracy / Philanthropy and Education / Philanthropy and the State

Why Exercise Restraint when Funneling Money into Politics? An Appeal to Mega Donors’ Self Interest

Editors’ Note: Reflecting on her new book, co-authored with Jeffrey Henig and Rebecca Jacobsen, Outside Money in School Board Elections: The Nationalization of Education Politics, Sarah Reckhow draws our attention to Los Angeles and details a new trend among mega donors in coordinating their philanthropic giving and political contributions. Reckhow argues that this behavioral shift … Continue reading

7 Ways to Read around the History of Philanthropy’s Diversity Problem this Black History Month
Philanthropy and Historical Research / Philanthropy and Inequality

7 Ways to Read around the History of Philanthropy’s Diversity Problem this Black History Month

Editors’ Note: Against the backdrop of Black History Month, Tyrone McKinley Freeman asks fellow historians of philanthropy to acknowledge black Americans’ history as philanthropists, reminding us that the current literature on the history of US philanthropy “does not fully capture the richness of African Americans’ giving, volunteering, associating, and advocating systems, models, behaviors and ways … Continue reading

Networked Social Movements and the ‘Tyranny of Structurelessness’
Current Events and Philanthropy / Philanthropy and Historical Research

Networked Social Movements and the ‘Tyranny of Structurelessness’

Editors’ Note: Rhodri Davies reflects on the contemporary relevance of Jo Freeman’s 1970 essay, “The Tyranny of Structurelessness.” The recent success of digitally-coordinated protest movements like Black Lives Matter and #MeToo has sparked a wave of interest in the potential for technology to transform the ways in which we organise. In particular, it has placed … Continue reading

Effective Altruism, Meet Animal Protection
New Works in the Field

Effective Altruism, Meet Animal Protection

Editors’ Note: Examining how the animal protection and effective altruism movements have come to intersect, Garrett M. Broad explains the ways that these communities have contributed to each other, what conflicts have emerged, and what the future holds for ‘effective animal advocacy.” In this essay, Broad draws from an academic article he wrote, published this past December in Agriculture … Continue reading

Aprill on LIBERAL SUPPRESSION: Viewing Section 501(c)(3)’s Speech Restrictions In Their Tax Context
New Works in the Field

Aprill on LIBERAL SUPPRESSION: Viewing Section 501(c)(3)’s Speech Restrictions In Their Tax Context

Editors’ Note: Ellen P. Aprill reviews Philip Hamburger’s Liberal Suppression: Section 501(c)(3) and the Taxation of Speech. Hamburger introduced his book’s central arguments in a previous HistPhil post and replies to Aprill’s review in the comments below. Philip Hamburger’s Liberal Suppression: Section 501(c)(3) and the Taxation of Speech opposes on constitutional grounds the limitation on lobbying and … Continue reading

Hamburger on LIBERAL SUPPRESSION: How Section 501(c)(3)’s Speech Restrictions Undermine Constitutional Rights
New Works in the Field

Hamburger on LIBERAL SUPPRESSION: How Section 501(c)(3)’s Speech Restrictions Undermine Constitutional Rights

Editors’ Note: Philip Hamburger introduces some central arguments of his recently published book, Liberal Suppression: Section 501(c)(3) and the Taxation of Speech. Ellen Aprill will follow later this week with a review of the book. Last spring I published a book on a revenue subsection—not something that would ordinarily stir the passions of readers. The subsection in … Continue reading

Rob Reich Responds
Book Forum on Reich's Just Giving / New Works in the Field

Rob Reich Responds

Editors’ Note: HistPhil’s forum on Rob Reich’s Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How it Can Do Better (2018) has included three separate reviews of the book by HistPhil co-editors Stanley N. Katz, Maribel Morey, and Benjamin Soskis. The forum closes with a response to these reviews from the book’s author, Rob Reich. In Just Giving: … Continue reading