A “thoroughly satisfactory and permanent remedy”: the Twentieth Century Invention of the American University Endowment
Philanthropy and Education / Philanthropy and Historical Research

A “thoroughly satisfactory and permanent remedy”: the Twentieth Century Invention of the American University Endowment

Editors’ Note: Swelling college and university endowments have attracted increased scrutiny and criticism; the recently released House GOP tax plan even included a tax on the investment income of college and university endowments with assets of $100,000 or more per full-time student. In this post, Bruce Kimball outlines the origin of such large university endowments. It is … Continue reading

Can Endowments Save Higher Education?
Current Events and Philanthropy / Philanthropy and Education

Can Endowments Save Higher Education?

Editors’ Note: In response to the recently-released annual survey of 805 college and university endowment returns and the Trump administration’s proposed “skinny budget,” Christopher P. Loss analyzes the future of American colleges and universities. He does so by providing historical context to these contemporary anxieties.  Last month, the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) released its annual … Continue reading

A History of Unequal Partnerships between American Foundations and African Universities
New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Education

A History of Unequal Partnerships between American Foundations and African Universities

Editors’ Note: Fabrice Jaumont contributes a post based on his new book, Unequal Partners: American Foundations and Higher Education Development in Africa (Palgrave-MacMillan, 2016). At a time when higher education is once again recognized as a driver of development and income growth, when knowledge economies requiring additional levels of education are displacing economies predicated on manufacturing, … Continue reading

What Gates and Broad Could Have Learned From Ford
New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Education

What Gates and Broad Could Have Learned From Ford

Editors’ Note: Megan Tompkins-Stange discusses her book, Policy Patrons, which was published by Harvard Education Press this month. Earlier this week, HistPhil co-editor Maribel Morey reviewed the book on this site.  “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it,” wrote George Santayana in 1905 – a perennially popular aphorism. But in the case of philanthropy, … Continue reading

Maribel Morey Reviews Tompkins-Stange’s POLICY PATRONS (2016)
New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Democracy / Philanthropy and Education

Maribel Morey Reviews Tompkins-Stange’s POLICY PATRONS (2016)

Editors’ Note: HistPhil co-editor, Maribel Morey, reviews Megan Tompkins-Stange’s new book, Policy Patrons: Philanthropy, Education Reform, and the Politics of Influence (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard Education Press, 2016). In Policy Patrons: Philanthropy, Education Reform, and the Politics of Influence, Megan Tompkins-Stange provides a fascinating peek into staff mentalities at the Gates, Broad, Kellogg, and Ford foundations. This is a … Continue reading

New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Education

Weighing the Value of the New Education Philanthropy

Editors’ Note: Continuing the site’s forum on philanthropy & education, Frederick M. Hess discusses his and Jeff Henig’s recent book and suggests ways that the philanthropic sector in the United States can play a positive role in education reform.  We invite readers to engage with this particular post and the broader philanthropy & education forum, along with the site’s more … Continue reading

New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Education / Philanthropy and Historical Research

Early 20th Century American Philanthropy in the Near East

Editors’ Note: Continuing the site’s forum on philanthropy & education, Michael Limberg presents some of his ongoing dissertation research on early twentieth century U.S. development in the Near East. By 1920, field workers and administrators of the New York-based humanitarian agency Near East Relief realized they had a problem: they had been extremely successful, perhaps too successful, … Continue reading

Philanthropy and Education

Economics was Once Radical: Then It Decided Not to Be

Editors’ Note: Continuing the philanthropy & education forum, Marshall I. Steinbaum and Bernard A. Weisberger discuss the politics of knowledge in U.S. economics associations and universities in the late nineteenth century. Though the authors do not write directly on philanthropy, the piece provides an opportunity to think about the ways that, even today, cultural contexts and individual trustees and … Continue reading

New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Education

The Economics of Funding Undergraduate Education in the United States

Editors’ Note: With this contribution, Thomas Adam continues the site’s philanthropy & education forum.  Rising tuition fees and a lack of scholarship support for an increasing number of college students forces more and more students to finance their university education through student loans. According to the Institute for College Access and Success, in the seven … Continue reading

Philanthropy and Education

Overstating the Role of Philanthropy in Education Reform

Editors’ Note: The philanthropy & education forum continues with this contribution by William Schambra. One thing upon which friends and foes of school choice agree: without the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, the initial education voucher experiment in Milwaukee would never have occurred. As fierce voucher opponent People for the American Way put it in 2003, … Continue reading

New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Education

Foundations and Education Reform in the Jim Crow South

Editors’ Note: Joan Malczewski continues the site’s philanthropy & education forum. William C. Chance established the Parmele Industrial Institute in Martin County, North Carolina, in 1910. Chance was an experienced educator with great ambitions, but it was difficult in the Jim Crow South to sustain an independent black school. Four years later, when his house was … Continue reading

Philanthropy and Education

Noting the Lessons from Newark & the Annenberg Challenge

Editors’ Note: Alexander Russo continues the site’s ongoing discussion on philanthropy & education. One of the main concerns about the current era of school reform is that its approach is “top-down” rather than “bottom-up.” That is, the methods and approaches that are used are designed and implemented by consultants and district administrators rather than community … Continue reading

Philanthropy and Education

The Unity of Philanthropy and Education

Editors’ Note: George McCully continues the site’s dialogue on philanthropy & education. Recent research into the meaning of the word “philanthropy” by reference to its etymology and history, has revealed that today’s customary usage is a pale reflection of the great tradition, which we would do well now to revive —especially in thinking about philanthropy … Continue reading

Current Events and Philanthropy / Philanthropy and Education

Upcoming Philamplify Debate on Reform Strategies in Education

Next Tuesday, the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy will host their first Philamplify debate on “Reform Strategies in Education.” Philamplify is the novel evaluative tool that NCRP designed, using some of the principles of crowd-sourcing, in which the NCRP performs a deep investigation into a single foundation, but also opens up the process to the … Continue reading

Current Events and Philanthropy / Philanthropy and Education

Reimagining Education: Philanthropy and Public Policy

Editors’ Note: Robin Rogers argues that philanthropy has undergone great change since the turn of this century, and particularly in the education sector. In her analysis of this “new” philanthropy, she engages with Johann Neem’s and Jeffrey Snyder’s recent contributions to the site’s philanthropy & education forum.  Laurene Powell Jobs, Steve Job’s widow, just gave fifty million … Continue reading

New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Education

Do Old and New K-12 Education Philanthropy Differ?

Editors’ Note: Jeffrey W. Snyder continues the site’s philanthropy & education forum.  Much of the emerging research on philanthropic involvement in K-12 education focuses on the “new” breed of extremely prominent funders like the Gates, Walton, and Broad foundations. These studies are undoubtedly important, and show how this newly emergent group has very defined preferences … Continue reading

Philanthropy and Education / Philanthropy in the News

Why We Consider Public Schools Public & Charter Schools Private

Editors’ Note: This piece by Johann N. Neem continues the site’s philanthropy & education forum.  Earlier this month, the Washington Supreme Court determined that charter schools are ineligible to receive public school funds under the 1889 state constitution. Article 9, section 2 of the Washington constitution states that “the entire revenue derived from the common … Continue reading

New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Education

Lessons from Mark Zuckerberg’s Grant for Educational Reform in Newark

Editors’ Note: As part of the ongoing forum on philanthropy & education, author of Follow the Money: How Foundation Dollars Change Public Schools Sarah Reckhow discusses Dale Russakoff’s recently-published book, The Prize: Who’s in Charge of America’s Schools? In 2010, Facebook Founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced a $100 million grant for educational reform in Newark on The Oprah Winfrey … Continue reading

Philanthropy and Education

Finding the Funding: The Professionalization of Development in American Higher Education

Editors’ Note: Today, John Thelin opens this site’s forum on the relationship between philanthropy and education. Readers, please feel free to comment on these posts, both via the comments section and Twitter, and please do reach out to us with post suggestions. And though we are moving on from last month’s discussion on philanthropy & inequality, also please … Continue reading

From the Editors / Philanthropy and Education

A Call for Contributions on the Chicago Annenberg Challenge

As part of HistPhil‘s education theme, we’d like to run a post, or a number of posts, on the Chicago Annenberg Challenge, which can be regarded as a precedent for some of the major educational philanthropic interventions of the current moment. If you are doing work on the Challenge, or know a scholar, researcher or … Continue reading