From Public Servant to Private Business: Dartmouth College and the Transformation of the Corporation
Dartmouth College v. Woodward

From Public Servant to Private Business: Dartmouth College and the Transformation of the Corporation

Editors’ Note: Evelyn Atkinson continues HistPhil‘s forum marking the bicentennial of the Dartmouth College v. Woodward case. In 1853, the Supreme Court of Ohio declared that the case of Trustees of Dartmouth College v. Woodward (1819) had become “a subterfuge for fraud and a means of shielding corporations from responsibility and correction for the abuse of their corporate … Continue reading

How Dartmouth College Commemorated the Bicentennial of the Dartmouth College Case
Dartmouth College v. Woodward

How Dartmouth College Commemorated the Bicentennial of the Dartmouth College Case

Editors’ Note: Robert Bonner continues HistPhil’s forum commemorating the 200th anniversary of Dartmouth College v. Woodward with a post on how Dartmouth College marked the occasion. Students at Dartmouth College launch the calendar year with two extravaganzas: a snowy Winter Carnival followed by a glitzy “Dartmouth Idol” talent competition. In 2019, a different sort of … Continue reading

The Dartmouth College Decision as a Pillar of the Regulatory State
Dartmouth College v. Woodward

The Dartmouth College Decision as a Pillar of the Regulatory State

Editors’ Note: Naomi Lamoreaux continues HistPhil’s forum marking the 200th anniversary of the Dartmouth College v. Woodward decision. In 1819 the U.S. Supreme Court announced in Dartmouth College v. Woodward that a charter granted by the state to form a private corporation was a contract protected by Article I, Section 10 of the federal constitution:  “No State … Continue reading

Public Men and Private Corporations: Dartmouth v Woodward and the Development of U.S. Civil Society
Dartmouth College v. Woodward

Public Men and Private Corporations: Dartmouth v Woodward and the Development of U.S. Civil Society

Editors’ Note: This post from Johann Neem begins HistPhil‘s online forum marking the 200th anniversary of the Supreme Court case Dartmouth College v. Woodward, a landmark decision in shaping the legal landscape of U.S. civil society. In this forum, a corps of distinguished scholars reflect on the complex legacy of Dartmouth v. Woodward, in the … Continue reading

How the Right Won the States: A Review of Hertel-Fernandez’s State Capture
New Works in the Field

How the Right Won the States: A Review of Hertel-Fernandez’s State Capture

Editors’ Note: Henry Farrell reviews Alexander Hertel-Fernandez’s State Capture: How Conservative Activists, Big Businesses, and Wealthy Donors Reshaped the American States – and the Nation. Read Hertel-Fernandez discuss his own research on ALEC and conservative “state capture” in the HistPhil forum on conservative philanthropy. A couple of months ago, Yvonne Wingett Sanchez and Rob O’Dell wrote … Continue reading

Wildcat Christianity and the Oil-fueled Politics of Corporate and Nonprofit Patronage In the Middle East
New Works in the Field

Wildcat Christianity and the Oil-fueled Politics of Corporate and Nonprofit Patronage In the Middle East

Editors’ Note: Darren Dochuk introduces the concept of “wildcat Christianity” and discusses the relationship between evangelical Christianity, southwestern petroleum, and support of Israel, a subject addressed in his new book, Anointed With Oil: How Christianity and Crude Made Modern America (Basic Books). “God, Gas, and Cash,” a recent article by Alex Kane and Nashwa Bawab in … Continue reading

Native Wisdom: A Review of Edgar Villanueva’s Decolonizing Wealth
New Works in the Field / Philanthropy

Native Wisdom: A Review of Edgar Villanueva’s Decolonizing Wealth

Editors’ Note: Michael Seltzer reviews Edgar Villanueva‘s new book, Decolonizing Wealth. In his book, The Wretched of the Earth, published in 1961, Frantz Fanon noted what he considered to be the necessary conditions for the overthrow of colonialism: “To tell the truth, the proof of success lies in a whole social structure being changed from … Continue reading

Fairbairn vs. Fidelity: The Lawsuit that Reflects rising concerns about the DAF boom
Philanthropy in the News

Fairbairn vs. Fidelity: The Lawsuit that Reflects rising concerns about the DAF boom

Editors’ Note: Brian Mittendorf outlines the stakes of the recently filed lawsuit, Emily and Malcolm Fairbairn vs. Fidelity Charitable, and discusses how it reflects mounting concerns about the rise of donor-advised funds. The New York Times’ Paul Sullivan recently highlighted an ongoing and prominent lawsuit between a wealthy couple and their financial advisors. The lawsuit … Continue reading

Plus ça change: The long history of questioning Charitable giving to Notre Dame
Current Events and Philanthropy / Philanthropy in the News

Plus ça change: The long history of questioning Charitable giving to Notre Dame

Editors’ Note: In light of recent controversies over private contributions to rebuild the cathedral, recently damaged by fire, Matthew Ross discusses the long history of questions about charitable giving to Notre Dame. The billion dollars pledged to repair Notre Dame de Paris stoked a public crisis of conscience. Before the smoke had cleared over the gothic … Continue reading

Corporate patronage for the arts in France in the 1980s and 1990s : a matter of the State
Philanthropy and the State in France

Corporate patronage for the arts in France in the 1980s and 1990s : a matter of the State

Editors’ Note: Closing HistPhil‘s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France, Sabine Rozier underscores the central role played by the French State in encouraging philanthropy in France. More specifically, Rozier argues that the “French philanthropic renewal in the 1980s and 1990s” was less “the expression of the awakening of a ‘civil society’ that would have … Continue reading

Walmart Heirs Shift from Red to Purple: The Evolving Political Contributions of the Nation’s Richest Family
Current Events and Philanthropy

Walmart Heirs Shift from Red to Purple: The Evolving Political Contributions of the Nation’s Richest Family

Editors’ Note: Leslie K. Finger and Sarah Reckhow write on the changing nature of Walton family political contributions. In the 2012 election cycle, 72 percent of partisan federal and state election contributions from family members serving on the board of the Walton Family Foundation supported Republican candidates and committees. Four years later, in the 2016 … Continue reading

Philanthropy without a State? On the Importance of Thinking Locally or what 19th century French History Can Teach Us
Philanthropy and the State in France

Philanthropy without a State? On the Importance of Thinking Locally or what 19th century French History Can Teach Us

Editors’ Note: Continuing HistPhil‘s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France, Matthieu Brejon de Lavergnée illustrates “how the French State—throughout much of the nineteenth century—relied on public and private treatment of poverty.”   « Nous voyons les femmes du monde, même les plus élégantes et les plus frivoles, travailler sans cesse pour les pauvres ; elles brodent, elles … Continue reading

Poll Power, Money Power: The Voter Education Project, Philanthropy, and the Movement for the Ballot in the American South
New Works in the Field

Poll Power, Money Power: The Voter Education Project, Philanthropy, and the Movement for the Ballot in the American South

Editors’ Note: Evan Faulkenbury introduces his new book on the Voter Education Project, Poll Power: The Voter Education Project and the Movement for the Ballot in the American South. Without money, the civil rights movement would not have had the critical resources it needed to defeat Jim Crow at the ballot box. This may be … Continue reading

“The Capable Man”—The Philanthropic Man—in 19th Century France
Philanthropy and the State in France

“The Capable Man”—The Philanthropic Man—in 19th Century France

Editors’ Note: Continuing HistPhil’s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France, Nagisa Mitsushima discusses philanthropy and electoral democracy during the first half of the 19th century in France. In dialogue with French studies on philanthropy, Mitsushima’s historical research “proposes to transform the view that we usually take on philanthropy, by shifting our analysis of … Continue reading

A Social Construction of Public Interest: The “Reconnaissance d’Utilité Publique” of Associations and Foundations by the Council of State (1870-1914)
Philanthropy and the State in France

A Social Construction of Public Interest: The “Reconnaissance d’Utilité Publique” of Associations and Foundations by the Council of State (1870-1914)

Editors’ Note: Chloé Gaboriaux continues HistPhil’s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France. In this essay, Gaboriaux analyzes “how members of the French Council of State, in charge of authorizing the incorporation of nonprofit organizations, reasoned about the general value of foundations and associations at a time (1870-1914) when the young Republic was defining a … Continue reading

INTRODUCTION: Philanthropies and State Prestige in France, 19th-20th Centuries
Philanthropy and the State in France

INTRODUCTION: Philanthropies and State Prestige in France, 19th-20th Centuries

Editors’ Note: Nicolas Duvoux launches HistPhil’s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France. De-centering U.S. exceptionalism in the history of philanthropy, this forum provides a historical and present-day context to philanthropy in France. For HistPhil readers, this collection of essays furthermore provides an opportunity to analyze vital questions at the heart of civic life: … Continue reading

The State as a symbolic resource in the philanthropic world? The example of the American Friends groups of French cultural institutions
Philanthropy and the State in France

The State as a symbolic resource in the philanthropic world? The example of the American Friends groups of French cultural institutions

Editors’ Note: Anne Monier continues HistPhil‘s forum on Philanthropy and the State in France. Bringing a transnational lens to philanthropic giving in contemporary France (and with a particular focus on American Friends groups), Monier argues that the French State is playing a critical role in encouraging private funding of the country’s cultural institutions. Within this transnational … Continue reading

An Economic History Challenge to the History of Philanthropy
New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Historical Research

An Economic History Challenge to the History of Philanthropy

Editors’ Note: David Hammack reviews Organizations, Civil Society, and the Roots of Development, edited by Naomi R. Lamoreaux and John Joseph Wallis. For more than thirty years a growing literature has debated the origins of the market economy and the relation between the market and economic growth. Motivating this debate is the understanding, widely shared … Continue reading

Highlighting the (Elitist) History of the Charitable Contribution Income Tax Deduction
New Works in the Field

Highlighting the (Elitist) History of the Charitable Contribution Income Tax Deduction

Editors’ Note: Nicolas Duquette highlights the history of the charitable contribution income tax deduction, in a preview of an upcoming article in Business History Review.  The US charitable-contribution income-tax deduction marked its centennial in 2017. Relative to nearly every other aspect of the federal income tax, the workings of the deduction have changed little since its creation in … Continue reading

Giving Athletes: Why Sports Philanthropy Deserves Our Attention
Current Events and Philanthropy / Philanthropy

Giving Athletes: Why Sports Philanthropy Deserves Our Attention

Editors’ Note: Sarah Fields spotlights the need for more scholarly attention directed to the history of athletes’ philanthropy. Athletes are a complicated group. Sporting figures have long been celebrities, but they have not always been wealthy either as a class or as individuals. And yet they have long been involved in various ways with philanthropy and … Continue reading