Mission to the Missiologists: The Protestant Foreign Missionary Project and the History of Philanthropy
New Works in the Field

Mission to the Missiologists: The Protestant Foreign Missionary Project and the History of Philanthropy

Editors’ Note: David A. Hollinger calls for scholars, and especially scholars of philanthropy, to engage with the history of missionaries and mission work in the United States. He makes his case in part based on his experience working on one of his  recent books, Protestants Abroad: How Missionaries Tried to Change the World but Changed … Continue reading

Broad on THE GOSPEL OF KINDNESS: ANIMAL WELFARE AND THE MAKING OF MODERN AMERICA (2016)
New Works in the Field

Broad on THE GOSPEL OF KINDNESS: ANIMAL WELFARE AND THE MAKING OF MODERN AMERICA (2016)

Editors’ Note: Garrett M. Broad reviews Janet M. Davis’s The Gospel of Kindness: Animal Welfare and the Making of Modern America (Oxford University Press, 2016). Among those who identify as members of the animal rights community in the United States, religion is rarely a motivating factor for activism. Quite the contrary, animal rights activists are … Continue reading

Donations Without Domination: Private Charity and Republican Liberty
New Works in the Field / Political Scientists and Philanthropy

Donations Without Domination: Private Charity and Republican Liberty

Editors’ Note: Robert S. Taylor introduces his “competitive model of public charity,” which he argues satisfies the imperatives of the republican intellectual tradition and which he outlined in a recent article in the Journal of Political Philosophy. Over the centuries, the republican intellectual tradition has focused on limiting domination of some citizens by others—be they … Continue reading

McCarthy on THE MOMENT OF LIFT: HOW EMPOWERING WOMEN CHANGES THE WORLD (2019)
New Works in the Field

McCarthy on THE MOMENT OF LIFT: HOW EMPOWERING WOMEN CHANGES THE WORLD (2019)

Editors’ Note: Kathleen D. McCarthy reviews Melinda Gates’s The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World (New York: Flatiron Books, 2019). Melinda Gates’s The Moment of Lift, is a feminist Gospel of Wealth for the 21st century. While Andrew Carnegie’s much-cited 1889 essay, “Gospel of Wealth,” issued a clarion call to his fellow … Continue reading

World Vision and Divergences within Evangelical Humanitarianism: A Review of King’s God’s Internationalists
New Works in the Field

World Vision and Divergences within Evangelical Humanitarianism: A Review of King’s God’s Internationalists

Editors’ Note: Heather D. Curtis reviews David P. King‘s God’s Internationalists: World Vision and the Age of Evangelical Humanitarianism. King introduced his work to HistPhil readers earlier this week. Recently, I attended a Protestant church service on “Hope Sunday.” After watching a professional video that documented the Evangelical Covenant Church’s work in the Democratic Republic of Congo … Continue reading

Religion’s Role in International Relief and Development: World Vision and the Age of Evangelical Humanitarianism
New Works in the Field

Religion’s Role in International Relief and Development: World Vision and the Age of Evangelical Humanitarianism

Editors’ Note: David P. King discusses the history of World Vision, the subject of his new book, God’s Internationalists: World Vision and the Age of Evangelical Humanitarianism. Heather Curtis will offer a review of the book on HistPhil later this week. In twentieth-century histories of philanthropy, religion rarely makes a major appearance. Of course, almost … Continue reading

Common Enemies: Why Americans Favor Single-Disease Campaigns
New Works in the Field

Common Enemies: Why Americans Favor Single-Disease Campaigns

Editors’ Note: Rachel Best discusses the long history of single disease charitable campaigns in the United States, the subject of her new book, Common Enemies: Disease Campaigns in America (Oxford, 2019). In October, pink ribbons decorate everything from sneakers to buckets of fried chicken, and hundreds of thousands of people participate in walks or runs to … Continue reading

How the Right Won the States: A Review of Hertel-Fernandez’s State Capture
New Works in the Field

How the Right Won the States: A Review of Hertel-Fernandez’s State Capture

Editors’ Note: Henry Farrell reviews Alexander Hertel-Fernandez’s State Capture: How Conservative Activists, Big Businesses, and Wealthy Donors Reshaped the American States – and the Nation. Read Hertel-Fernandez discuss his own research on ALEC and conservative “state capture” in the HistPhil forum on conservative philanthropy. A couple of months ago, Yvonne Wingett Sanchez and Rob O’Dell wrote … Continue reading

Wildcat Christianity and the Oil-fueled Politics of Corporate and Nonprofit Patronage In the Middle East
New Works in the Field

Wildcat Christianity and the Oil-fueled Politics of Corporate and Nonprofit Patronage In the Middle East

Editors’ Note: Darren Dochuk introduces the concept of “wildcat Christianity” and discusses the relationship between evangelical Christianity, southwestern petroleum, and support of Israel, a subject addressed in his new book, Anointed With Oil: How Christianity and Crude Made Modern America (Basic Books). “God, Gas, and Cash,” a recent article by Alex Kane and Nashwa Bawab in … Continue reading

Native Wisdom: A Review of Edgar Villanueva’s Decolonizing Wealth
New Works in the Field / Philanthropy

Native Wisdom: A Review of Edgar Villanueva’s Decolonizing Wealth

Editors’ Note: Michael Seltzer reviews Edgar Villanueva‘s new book, Decolonizing Wealth. In his book, The Wretched of the Earth, published in 1961, Frantz Fanon noted what he considered to be the necessary conditions for the overthrow of colonialism: “To tell the truth, the proof of success lies in a whole social structure being changed from … Continue reading

Poll Power, Money Power: The Voter Education Project, Philanthropy, and the Movement for the Ballot in the American South
New Works in the Field

Poll Power, Money Power: The Voter Education Project, Philanthropy, and the Movement for the Ballot in the American South

Editors’ Note: Evan Faulkenbury introduces his new book on the Voter Education Project, Poll Power: The Voter Education Project and the Movement for the Ballot in the American South. Without money, the civil rights movement would not have had the critical resources it needed to defeat Jim Crow at the ballot box. This may be … Continue reading

An Economic History Challenge to the History of Philanthropy
New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Historical Research

An Economic History Challenge to the History of Philanthropy

Editors’ Note: David Hammack reviews Organizations, Civil Society, and the Roots of Development, edited by Naomi R. Lamoreaux and John Joseph Wallis. For more than thirty years a growing literature has debated the origins of the market economy and the relation between the market and economic growth. Motivating this debate is the understanding, widely shared … Continue reading

Highlighting the (Elitist) History of the Charitable Contribution Income Tax Deduction
New Works in the Field

Highlighting the (Elitist) History of the Charitable Contribution Income Tax Deduction

Editors’ Note: Nicolas Duquette highlights the history of the charitable contribution income tax deduction, in a preview of an upcoming article in Business History Review.  The US charitable-contribution income-tax deduction marked its centennial in 2017. Relative to nearly every other aspect of the federal income tax, the workings of the deduction have changed little since its creation in … Continue reading

Force for Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence
New Works in the Field

Force for Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence

Editors’ Note: Kellie Carter Jackson makes the case for a fuller scholarly engagement with black abolitionists and their “profound understanding of the idea, experience and value of violence,” the subject of her new book, Force and Freedom. John Anderson was an escaped slave who fled to Canada. On July 5, 1861 the Toronto Globe recounted the speech he … Continue reading

Why Exercise Restraint when Funneling Money into Politics? An Appeal to Mega Donors’ Self Interest
New Works in the Field / Philanthropy and Democracy / Philanthropy and Education / Philanthropy and the State

Why Exercise Restraint when Funneling Money into Politics? An Appeal to Mega Donors’ Self Interest

Editors’ Note: Reflecting on her new book, co-authored with Jeffrey Henig and Rebecca Jacobsen, Outside Money in School Board Elections: The Nationalization of Education Politics, Sarah Reckhow draws our attention to Los Angeles and details a new trend among mega donors in coordinating their philanthropic giving and political contributions. Reckhow argues that this behavioral shift … Continue reading

Effective Altruism, Meet Animal Protection
New Works in the Field

Effective Altruism, Meet Animal Protection

Editors’ Note: Examining how the animal protection and effective altruism movements have come to intersect, Garrett M. Broad explains the ways that these communities have contributed to each other, what conflicts have emerged, and what the future holds for ‘effective animal advocacy.” In this essay, Broad draws from an academic article he wrote, published this past December in Agriculture … Continue reading

Aprill on LIBERAL SUPPRESSION: Viewing Section 501(c)(3)’s Speech Restrictions In Their Tax Context
New Works in the Field

Aprill on LIBERAL SUPPRESSION: Viewing Section 501(c)(3)’s Speech Restrictions In Their Tax Context

Editors’ Note: Ellen P. Aprill reviews Philip Hamburger’s Liberal Suppression: Section 501(c)(3) and the Taxation of Speech. Hamburger introduced his book’s central arguments in a previous HistPhil post and replies to Aprill’s review in the comments below. Philip Hamburger’s Liberal Suppression: Section 501(c)(3) and the Taxation of Speech opposes on constitutional grounds the limitation on lobbying and … Continue reading

Hamburger on LIBERAL SUPPRESSION: How Section 501(c)(3)’s Speech Restrictions Undermine Constitutional Rights
New Works in the Field

Hamburger on LIBERAL SUPPRESSION: How Section 501(c)(3)’s Speech Restrictions Undermine Constitutional Rights

Editors’ Note: Philip Hamburger introduces some central arguments of his recently published book, Liberal Suppression: Section 501(c)(3) and the Taxation of Speech. Ellen Aprill will follow later this week with a review of the book. Last spring I published a book on a revenue subsection—not something that would ordinarily stir the passions of readers. The subsection in … Continue reading

Rob Reich Responds
Book Forum on Reich's Just Giving / New Works in the Field

Rob Reich Responds

Editors’ Note: HistPhil’s forum on Rob Reich’s Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How it Can Do Better (2018) has included three separate reviews of the book by HistPhil co-editors Stanley N. Katz, Maribel Morey, and Benjamin Soskis. The forum closes with a response to these reviews from the book’s author, Rob Reich. In Just Giving: … Continue reading

Crossing the border between helping and being helped: Informal Giving and the U.S. Immigrant Crisis
Current Events and Philanthropy / New Works in the Field

Crossing the border between helping and being helped: Informal Giving and the U.S. Immigrant Crisis

Editors’ Note: Jamie Goodwin introduces her research on the informal giving network of immigration communities at the U.S. Southern border. [Haga clic aquí para la versión en español de este artículo.] “Our principal thesis is that a river of care rises…and that we must trace its flow through all its branches, including all those hidden yet … Continue reading